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The contribution of perceived death competence in determining the professional quality of life of novice oncology nurses: A multicentre study

  • Yanhui Wang
    Affiliations
    Department of Hepatobiliary Cancer, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, National Clinical Research Centre for Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin's Clinical Research Centre for Cancer, Tianjin, China
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  • Ying Huang
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing, Chengde Medical College, Chengde, China
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Dong Fengqi and Ruishuang Zheng are co-corresponding authors.
    Ruishuang Zheng
    Correspondence
    Corresponding authors.
    Footnotes
    1 Dong Fengqi and Ruishuang Zheng are co-corresponding authors.
    Affiliations
    Department of Hepatobiliary Cancer, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, National Clinical Research Centre for Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin's Clinical Research Centre for Cancer, Tianjin, China
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  • Jingyu Xu
    Affiliations
    Department of Hepatobiliary Cancer, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, National Clinical Research Centre for Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin's Clinical Research Centre for Cancer, Tianjin, China
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  • Liuliu Zhang
    Affiliations
    Department of Nursing, Jiangsu Province Cancer Hospital, Nanjing, China
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  • Ping Zhu
    Affiliations
    Department of Nursing, Jiangsu Province Cancer Hospital, Nanjing, China
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  • Zhenqi Lu
    Affiliations
    Department of Nursing, Fudan Cancer Hospital, Shanghai, China
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  • Li Wang
    Affiliations
    Department of VIP Medical Services, Cancer Hospital Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China
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  • Juan Xie
    Affiliations
    Department of Nursing, Shanxi Province Cancer Hospital, Xi'an, China
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  • Jiang Zhao
    Affiliations
    Department of Nursing, Shanxi Province Cancer Hospital, Xi'an, China
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Dong Fengqi and Ruishuang Zheng are co-corresponding authors.
    Fengqi Dong
    Correspondence
    Corresponding authors.
    Footnotes
    1 Dong Fengqi and Ruishuang Zheng are co-corresponding authors.
    Affiliations
    Department of Hepatobiliary Cancer, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, National Clinical Research Centre for Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin's Clinical Research Centre for Cancer, Tianjin, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 Dong Fengqi and Ruishuang Zheng are co-corresponding authors.
Published:January 23, 2023DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejon.2023.102273

      Highlights

      • Death competence could predict novice oncology nurses' professional quality of life.
      • Cultural-sensitive interventions are needed to improve these nurses' death competence.
      • Copying style and supportive environment are vital to enhance their professional quality of life.

      Abstract

      Purpose

      Novice nurses find it challenging to cope with patient dying and death, especially in a death taboo cultural context, such as mainland China. By taking the example of Chinese novice oncology nurses, this study aimed to explore the contribution of their perceived death competence in determining their professional quality of life.

      Method

      A multicentre, cross-sectional study was conducted in six tertiary cancer hospitals in mainland China involving 506 novice oncology nurses. Measurements were the Coping with Death Scale-Chinese version, the Professional Quality of Life Questionnaire, and the Coping Style Questionnaire. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to analyse the data.

      Results

      Death competence was significantly associated with compassion satisfaction (r = 0.509, P < 0.001), burnout (r = −0.441, P < 0.001) and secondary traumatic stress (r = −0.154, P < 0.001) which are the three dimensions of professional quality of life. The results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses demonstrated that death competence positively predicted compassion satisfaction and negatively predicted burnout (P < 0.01), but had no significant impact on secondary traumatic stress after coping style was entered into the model (P > 0.05).

      Conclusions

      Novice oncology nurses who perceive themselves to be incompetent in dealing with patient dying and death are more likely to experience poor professional quality of life in the death taboo cultural context. Cultural-sensitive interventions and a supportive work environment are important to enhance these nurses’ death competence, increasing their professional quality of life and ultimately contributing to better end-of-life cancer care management.

      Keywords

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